Change the game

On 29/05/2015 I had to leave the #ldinsight [1] Twitter chat early, so nearly missed a conversation involving @lellielesley @skanedog @dds180. They were talking about tabletop games and how to use them in learning and development. Luckily, I found chance to revisit the tweets and was able to contribute to the thread before everyone moved on to other discussions.

Obviously, the numerous co-op games [2] available out there are perfect to explore collaboration, planning, dealing with problems, decision making and even delegation/leadership. Once your delegates get past the novelty of (and for some an aversion to) gaming these can produce lots of discussion points for whatever learning points you are trying to focus on.

There is much written on the gamification of learning and how this can help some learners embed the new knowledge or explore areas of potential development. However, it would be wrong to think of this as something new. Most of us learn how to do things as a child via an adult making a game of it (Wondering how many children have had food ‘flown’ into their mouths on imaginary aeroplanes).

As far as work based learning goes, I can remember taking part in a basic board game when attending a training session on Team Work, way back in the (very) late 1980’s. Unfortunately the trainer was not great at converting the session into learning and I got the feeling that he was using it to fill time rather than as a true development opportunity. Looking back at my own use of games in team building I recognise that my first few attempts were very similar to that experience and most of the delegate’s learning probably came from their own interpretation, rather than any insights drawn out by me.

As time moved on I began to think about what it was I wanted to get from the activities and (hopefully) improved the experience for all involved. Over the years I have used numerous different games to aid knowledge and skills development; some designed for the subject, others I’ve manipulated to my learners needs.

Back to the present, and as the tweet chat continued we moved away from learning and development and started to talk about games we enjoy from a personal point of view. It was during this discussion that I mentioned one of my favourites, a card game called Fluxx.

The goal of the game is to collect a specific group of picture cards and the first to achieve this wins. Easy! Not quite. The challenge comes from the fact that the rules change, rapidly. One minute you may be able to pick up 2 cards and play 1 per turn and then suddenly you now have to pick up 4, play them all and only be holding 1 card in your hand. Meanwhile the set of cards you were trying to collect have changed and merely by having one of the old ones in your hand you can receive penalties.

As I was thinking about the game it suddenly dawned on me that this type of rapidly morphing game may be perfect for examining change and how you can plan/adapt to it. In the fast changing world of business (and I include all sectors in that group) we constantly have situations where all the planning we did comes to nothing, as things halt or head off in numerous other directions. There is a danger of panicking in this situation, if we don’t adapt, and everyone is now expected to meet these challenges and keep moving forward.

In a comfy training room, it is very difficult to communicate the accompanying feeling of helplessness these changes can cause and see how people deal with that situation. If used correctly I can see this game providing the adrenaline levels required to show the delegate’s coping mechanisms and applying some thought to the post session questions may provide some interesting insights.

Unfortunately, it’s going to be a couple of months before I get the opportunity to try this out with some learners, but if you decide to give it a go (or have already done so) please let me know about your experiences.

As an aside, @Skanedog shared a link to a funny YouTube video titled “Fluxx in real life”.

[1] #ldinsight is a Twitter chat, co-ordinated by @lndconnect and takes place every Friday between 8am-9am (GMT). If you have any interest in learning and development follow the hashtag and join in.

[2] ‘co-op games’ is short hand for ‘co-operative games’. As the name implies these tend to require two or more players to work together to achieve a goal.

Creative Commons License
Change the game by David Wallace was written in London, England and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Advertisements